Kiyomi Takano / Yomiuri Shimbun Staff Writer
Chiba University, in cooperation with the Chiba City Museum of Art, began offering classes last year on planning and producing art exhibitions. The purpose of the two classes is to give students hands-on experience in the field and to deepen ties between the university and the surrounding community.
The two classes–“Tenji o Tsukuru” (making exhibitions) and “Hakubutsukan Jisshu” (practical experience at museums)–are part of the university’s liberal arts curriculum. Students enrolled in the courses are required to produce two exhibitions per academic year. For the first term, the students must create an exhibition at the Chiba City Museum of Art using items from its permanent collection, while in the second term, they are required to arrange a group show of contemporary artists at a Chiba gallery.
From Jan. 13 to 24, one such exhibition was held at the Chiba Citizens’ Gallery Inage. “Hana Ibara–Himerareta Bi e” (Flowers with Thorns–Toward Hidden Beauty) featured artwork by seven artists, including Chieko Oshie and Yoshihiro Suda. Artists were suggested to the students by Shingo Jinno, an associate professor on the university’s faculty of education who is in charge of the classes.
The organizing students discussed among themselves a variety of aspects of the exhibition, including its layout, title and poster designs.
They also worked with the artists on site to create work and made a list of works on display to be handed out to visitors. The students also hung the artwork, under the guidance of Hirokazu Mizunuma, the museum’s assistant curator.
Students in the program hail from a number of faculties at the university. Among them are people who want to work as assistant curators; others are simply interested in holding exhibitions.
“We helped the artists on-site, so we were able to see up close how they created their artwork,” said Asumi Kinjo, a senior majoring in Japanese literature.
“Talking with students from other faculties made it feel like an actual workplace,” said Hidemi Yoshida, a senior in the engineering faculty’s design department.
The process has proved beneficial to the museums, too, because it widens their activities.
“We get more opportunities to meet visitors at gallery talks and lectures [through holding exhibitions with the students], and teaching them has been a valuable experience for us, too, because it has helped to better our communication skills,” Mizunuma said.
The university has been offering classes that place importance on its relationship with the local community. One such class is “Bunka o Tsukuru” (Making culture), taught by Jinno. Students in the class are core members of “WiCan,” a project for revitalizing local communities through the arts. Since 2003, the students have been involved in activities such as holding exhibitions in city centers, as well as cooperating with artists, art museums, nonprofit organizations and shopping malls.
“I want our students to come away from the process not only knowing how to exhibit works of art, but also what means they can use to convey the works’ messages,” Jinno said.
“I think that by actually talking to artists, students can learn that there are many different ways to look at things,” Jinno added.

Chiba students display art exhibition skillsKiyomi Takano / Yomiuri Shimbun Staff Writer
Chiba University, in cooperation with the Chiba City Museum of Art, began offering classes last year on planning and producing art exhibitions. The purpose of the two classes is to give students hands-on experience in the field and to deepen ties between the university and the surrounding community.
The two classes–“Tenji o Tsukuru” (making exhibitions) and “Hakubutsukan Jisshu” (practical experience at museums)–are part of the university’s liberal arts curriculum. Students enrolled in the courses are required to produce two exhibitions per academic year. For the first term, the students must create an exhibition at the Chiba City Museum of Art using items from its permanent collection, while in the second term, they are required to arrange a group show of contemporary artists at a Chiba gallery.
From Jan. 13 to 24, one such exhibition was held at the Chiba Citizens’ Gallery Inage. “Hana Ibara–Himerareta Bi e” (Flowers with Thorns–Toward Hidden Beauty) featured artwork by seven artists, including Chieko Oshie and Yoshihiro Suda. Artists were suggested to the students by Shingo Jinno, an associate professor on the university’s faculty of education who is in charge of the classes.
The organizing students discussed among themselves a variety of aspects of the exhibition, including its layout, title and poster designs.
They also worked with the artists on site to create work and made a list of works on display to be handed out to visitors. The students also hung the artwork, under the guidance of Hirokazu Mizunuma, the museum’s assistant curator.
Students in the program hail from a number of faculties at the university. Among them are people who want to work as assistant curators; others are simply interested in holding exhibitions.
“We helped the artists on-site, so we were able to see up close how they created their artwork,” said Asumi Kinjo, a senior majoring in Japanese literature.
“Talking with students from other faculties made it feel like an actual workplace,” said Hidemi Yoshida, a senior in the engineering faculty’s design department.
The process has proved beneficial to the museums, too, because it widens their activities.
“We get more opportunities to meet visitors at gallery talks and lectures [through holding exhibitions with the students], and teaching them has been a valuable experience for us, too, because it has helped to better our communication skills,” Mizunuma said.
The university has been offering classes that place importance on its relationship with the local community. One such class is “Bunka o Tsukuru” (Making culture), taught by Jinno. Students in the class are core members of “WiCan,” a project for revitalizing local communities through the arts. Since 2003, the students have been involved in activities such as holding exhibitions in city centers, as well as cooperating with artists, art museums, nonprofit organizations and shopping malls.
“I want our students to come away from the process not only knowing how to exhibit works of art, but also what means they can use to convey the works’ messages,” Jinno said.
“I think that by actually talking to artists, students can learn that there are many different ways to look at things,” Jinno added.
(Feb. 9, 2010 Daily Yomiuri)