Make Digital Flash Cards and Study Aid cards using free programs: 

Homeschooling parents or teachers, you can make your own flashcards at!

Are your kids learning how to read or studying multiplication tables, historical events or foreign languages? Some memorization tasks don’t lend themselves to meaningful mnemonics. For these, flash card exercises work well.

Now you can put a digital twist on the flash card system. Instead or index cards, use your computer. These programs will help you make digital flash cards. Best of all, you can’t beat the price-free!

1. Granule
Granule organizes flash cards according to the Leitner system. As you quiz yourself, the cards you guess correctly are moved to the back of the lineup. The cards that stump you stay up front. You spend more time on the answers you have trouble memorizing.

Simply enter text for the fronts and backs of your digital cards. The program was designed for word memorization. In fact, it can pronounce words for you. However, this setup requires a separate sound dictionary. You can get details on the Granule Web site. You can put any text, including numbers, on the cards.

Granule includes everything it needs in one folder. No installation is required. To remove it, simply delete its folder.

2. Memorize words
Memorize words was designed to help non-native speakers master English vocabulary. Nevertheless, it makes a great vocabulary booster for anyone. I use it with my kindergarten son for him to learn “sight words.”

To make a flash card, simply enter a word. Memorize words can fill in the definition for you by searching online versions of the Oxford English or Merriam-Webster dictionaries. The program can also fetch pronunciation recordings from the Merriam-Webster site.

You can enter example sentences on your cards as hints. Memorize words can search the Internet for sentences including your words. However, this feature is not quite perfect.

Memorize words includes everything it needs in one folder. No install or uninstall is necessary. To start the program, double-click the “memorize-words.jar” file.

3. Pauker
Pauker was designed as a tool for last-minute cramming. Even so, it makes a great study aid for any student. Pauker is the most intuitive program in this list.

To make a card, click the “Add new cards” button. Then fill out the front and back of the card. You can enter any text, including numbers. To start quizzing yourself, click “Learn new cards.”

Pauker allows you to set time limits and other rules. You can practice by filling in a blank or by simply revealing answers. You can also reverse the fronts and backs of the cards. That’s handy for learning chemical elements or historical figures.

Pauker comes as a single .exe file. You don’t have to install or uninstall it. To remove it, simply delete the file.

More DIY flashcard resources:  ProProfs is another community site, where you can create your own deck of flashcards, or use a deck created by someone else. Flashcards can include images and color (woo hoo!), but before you begin you will need to create a free account. Flashcards can be studied online, downloaded as a text file, or printed in your choice of text size (small, medium or large.) When browsing existing subjects, try using the “Most Liked” tab to view the listings, instead of the default “Most Recent.” “Make your own flash cards and study aids. Print, Cut, Fold, and Study.” KitzKikz does a fantastic job creating simple printable (PDF) flashcards from your own list. You can either type the front and back words into the form on the home page, or cut and paste from another document using the Import function. If your imported list uses a comma to separate the front and back phrases, use the Search/Replace button to replace all the commas with tabs. It’s so easy! is a terrific resource. is supposed to be very popular but it also seems to be problematic for many users
Letter Tracing language flashcards at
I also like but it is not downloadable